The Three Things That Secure Agents Never Say

There is a saying that bees, dogs, and bears can smell fear.

I don’t know if it is true, but I am certain that prospective clients can smell fear. From what I see when I am training agents, they can smell it.

At the very least, they can smell insecurity, which is a form of fear.

An insecure agent projects uncertainty and a lack of confidence. We’ve all been there. We all have a starting point and there is a steep learning curve.

New agents carry that uncertainty into a home and project it onto a client.

If you have been doing this for a while, I am sure you remember those first days. Insecurity can be an application repellent.

In order to grow in our confidence, we need to learn our products and processes. We need to get our reps in. We need to practice, practice, practice. Lastly, we need to change our language and our attitudes when communicating with prospective clients.

Here are some quick tips on statements that you need to begin changing right now in order to project more confidence and get more applications.

Is it okay?

Asking permission is an application killer. Believe it or not, most people are used to being directed, especially when sitting with someone who represents a form of authority.

A good example of this is a nurse working in a hospital. A good nurse, in order to provide the best care and treatment; will clear a room of visitors and direct the patient to move accordingly. In most cases these nurses are simply stating what needs to happen. They are not seeking permission. They say things like,”I’m going to need the family to step out for a moment so that I can help Mr. Jones.” They speak directly and nicely and as a result, people move.

Our clients are expecting us to speak and act in the same way. If you need to review a policy, don’t ask, “Is it okay if I take a look at that policy?”

Instead, you can simply say something along the lines of, “Mr. Jones, you mentioned earlier that you have another policy. Before I advise you, I’m going to need you to go grab it while I take a look at something for you.”

If you project confidence, your prospective clients will do what you suggest. Just remember, they are expecting to be directed by a caring professional who has done this before (or at least appears to have done this before) and knows what they are doing. 

I’m sorry to bother you

Do you realize how often people apologize? Many people use the word “sorry” way too liberally.

We use it almost as much as we use the word love. We love our shows, our pizza, our pets, and our spouses. We use these words so much that they start to lose their meaning.

Practicing taking an assertive stance on who you are and what you are trying to accomplish is key to eliminating insecurity and projecting confidence and competence.

It is also important to remember the importance of what you do. Do you really believe in your products and services? You should, because families’ financial futures are at stake.

You are the expert that can and should advise them to make the best choice in regards to protecting their families. Why in the world would you apologize for bothering someone? You do incredibly important work and your work is not a bother.

What time works best for you?

Have you ever heard someone one say, “If you want something done, ask a busy person”?

My wife and I were recently talking about how true this really is, and the crazy thing is that everybody knows it! Our culture is built on it.

When you must schedule an appointment, nothing communicates insecurity or weakness like sharing your big uneventful empty calendar.

When you do this, it communicates that what you are doing isn’t very important and that the prospective client’s time is more important than yours. This is clearly not true.

You are providing a valuable service. Your calendar should be filled with people who need your help.

Your prospective client is lucky to be able to schedule a time with you! The more you value your time, the more they will value your time.

If you are scheduling appointments, bookend your day. Start at the beginning and the end, and schedule and fill it towards the middle. This communicates that you are the one who is in control. 

Consider eliminating these statements… Bur more importantly, master your craft. Mastering your craft will help you build confidence, which will not only eliminate these statements, but the attitude and mindset that produces these kinds of statements as well.

Remember that you are a difference maker and your product and service is a valuable resource to the families you serve and the country as a whole. Don’t ever forget it. Go serve your clients confidently. They deserve it, and so do you.

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